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3D Art Projects

3D Art Projects

3D Art Projects

Life Cast Sculpture Project

Objective: Using plaster, found objects, textured materials and acrylic paint on a hardboard support, create a high–relief or a low–relief sculpture. Your relief must combine at least one lifecast component with found objects and textured materials to reveal some aspect of your personality. Try to reach past the superficial persona that you might project to the world on a daily basis – being a sports fan, going to the beach, gardening, partying, etc. – and choose imagery that explores your deepest fear, fondest desire or worst memory.

Procedure: To prepare for this project, you should spend at least one week collecting interesting materials that can be used in a metaphorical way. For example: razor blades and tacks might be used to represent sharp pain; broken dishes might be used to represent domestic upheaval; a pile of chicken bones might represent death and decay. Some objects and textured materials can be salvaged from your basement, garage, attic or from around the house. You may also want to visit dollar stores and second–hand stores like Value Village to obtain inexpensive objects that can help to tell your story.

Next, create a waste mould of your face (and limbs if necessary) using plaster bandages. Prepare the mould with release agent and then cast plaster into it. When the plaster has set, de–mould your lifecast and clean it up.

When you're ready with your cast, textured items and objects, experiment with a variety of compositions by placing things in different positions on the hardboard. Your textures and objects should interact with your lifecast to imbue the overall work with a narrative quality. For example, a fringe of fun fur surrounding your cast might create animal–like associations; surrounding your lifecast with circuit boards and machine parts could create associations with technology or science–fiction.

Examples of Student Works

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When you've decided where your cast will sit on the hardboard support, draw a faint pencil line around it on the board. CAUTION: Avoid creating a "bulls eye" by placing it smack in the centre of the board. Use PL400 Construction Adhesive to connect your cast to the support.

TECHNICAL: Depending on the weight and the composition of the rest of your objects and materials, you will need to attach them with carpenters glue, white glue, PL400, silicone or hot glue (the PL400 always works best for plaster casts of hands and arms). If your objects and materials are very awkward or heavy, it may be necessary to use mechanical fasteners such as screws, bolts or rivets.

To get a good mark, your finished work must exhibit a comprehensive understanding of the Compositional Principles of Emphasis, Variety, Balance, Unity, Rhythm, Proportion and Scale. Your work will also show that you have attended to the details of creating a stable and well-finished lifecast with convincing humanoid features. Your cast(s) and objects must also be affixed to the support in such a way that excess PL400 glue and merchanical fasteners appear non-existent and all surfaces are clean and free of defects.

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© 2016, Terry Reynoldson